Tag Archives: veterinarian Floyds Knob IN

Crate Training Your Dog

Is your canine buddy crate trained? If not, you may want to work on this. Fido will likely need to be crated at some point, either at the vet’s or kennel, or during travel. This will be much easier for him if he thinks of his crate as a cozy den. A Georgetown, IN vet offers tips on crate training your pet in this article.

Choosing A Crate

You’ll want to make sure that your pet’s crate is sturdy, but still easy to move for travel. Dogs are much safer traveling in crates! If you have a puppy, choose a crate that will fit Fido’s adult size, Otherwise, you’ll just end up replacing it when your canine pal is full grown. Use a luggage tag to put your contact information on the crate. This will come in handy if you ever fly with your pooch.

Making It Comfy

Make sure your pup’s crate is nice and comfy for him. Add some soft bedding, and some cozy toys and treats. Location is also important. Don’t put Fido’s crate in a quiet back bedroom. Dogs are very sociable, and get lonely and depressed if they are left alone too much. A living room or family room is a great option.

Training

To get Fido used to his crate, you’ll want to help him form a positive association with it. How do you do that? Food is the easiest way. Toss toys and yummy treats into the crate, until he gets used to going in and out. Then, start feeding your pet in his crate. The next stage is to start shutting the door. At first, just shut it for a few moments, give Fido treats and praise, and then let him out. Gradually increase the time your furry buddy is crated, until he is comfortable with it. Ask your vet for specific advice.

Tips

Crates can be great tools, but only if they are used properly. Never use Fido’s crate as punishment for him. Also, avoid leaving your pup crated too long. A few hours during the day is plenty. You can crate your dog overnight, however. If Fido is properly crate trained, he won’t mind his crate at all. You may not even have to shut the door at doggy bedtime!

Please call us, your Georgetown, IN pet clinic, anytime. We are dedicated to providing excellent care!

Keeping Fluffy Out of the Tree

Are you putting up a tree this year? If so, you may find yourself trying to keep your kitty from destroying it! For Fluffy, trying to climb holiday trees is an important annual tradition! There are some things you can do to make sure that both your tree and your pet make it through the holidays unscathed. In this article, a Georgetown, IN discusses keeping Fluffy out of the tree.

Choose The Right Spot

Picking the right spot for your tree is very important, not just for the overall look of your home, but also because of kitty shenanigans. Don’t put the tree near anything Fluffy could jump off to reach it, like a desk or chair. That’s just making it easy for her!

Get An Artificial Trees

Synthetic trees are much harder for kitties to climb than real ones. Consider getting a fake tree this year.

Decorate Carefully

Avoid putting flashy and/or fragile ornaments on the bottom of the tree. Keep delicate decorations, tinsel, and lights on the top part of the tree, well out of paws’ reach. Put just a few sturdy, unbreakable ornaments on the lower branches.

Provide Kitty Entertainment

If you make the rest of your home fun and exciting for your cat, she may not find the tree quite as tempting. Offer Fluffy lots of fun toys to play with, and spend a few minutes a day playing with her. In fact, you can even give your feline pal some of her gifts a bit early. A fun session of Catch The Squeaky Toy will hopefully satisfy your pet’s urge to make mischief, and tire her out a bit.

Add Support

Choose a tree with a sturdy base, so it won’t wobble or topple over on your furball. You may also want to secure the top to your wall or ceiling with fishing line. This won’t show, but it will provide extra support.

Training

When you see your kitty looking at the tree with a gleam in her eye, stamp your foot, clap your hands, or bang two pots together. This won’t hurt Fluffy, but it will startle her a bit, and may make her reconsider the benefits of getting too near the tree.

Happy Holidays from all of us here at The Animal Hospital of Lanesville, your Georgetown, IN pet clinic. Please feel free to contact us anytime!

Halloween Hazards for Cats and Dogs

Halloween and trick-or-treat night are right around the corner. Did you know that the Halloween holiday is one of the most dangerous times of the year for our dogs and cats? Keep your pet safe with the following tips from a Floyds Knob, IN veterinarian.

Chocolate and Candy

Your trick-or-treat bowl is chock full of things that your pet shouldn’t have access to. Chocolate of all types—dark, milk, semi-sweet, white, even baking chocolate—contains caffeine and a chemical called theobromine, neither of which are safe for pets. Many candies, gums, and certain baked items are sweetened with xylitol, an artificial sugar substitute that is highly toxic to dogs and cats. Keep all goodies safely stored away in order to avoid a dangerous episode of poisoning.

Costumes

Are you planning on dressing up your pet in his or her very own Halloween costume this year? Make sure your animal companion is okay with wearing clothes; many pets don’t take kindly to outfits, especially if they’re too baggy or tight-fitting. Also check through your pet’s costume and remove any small parts—plastic eyeballs, tips of drawstrings, etc.—that could be chewed off, swallowed, or choked on.

Holiday Decorations

Many families like to decorate their homes with autumn-themed plants like fall corn, pumpkins, and gourds. These items aren’t necessarily toxic to animals, but they can still cause trouble. Almost any foreign substance can cause vomiting if your pet eats too much, and bits of these plants can be chewed off and present a choking hazard. Don’t let your pet gain access.

Also be sure to tape down any cords running from electric Halloween decorations to the wall socket. Pets can chew on these, or get tangled up.

Anxiety

One of Halloween’s biggest dangers is one you may not have thought of: anxiety. If your pet gets worked up whenever the doorbell rings, trick-or-treat night can be very stress-inducing! Plus, some pets might try to dart out of the door when you open it for trick-or-treaters. Avoid the trouble by securing your pet in another room; try playing music or the radio at a medium volume to mask over the sound of the doorbell.

Do you need help preparing your pet for Halloween? Have more questions about keeping your animal friend safe this holiday? Give your vet in Floyds Knob, IN a call today. We’re here to serve all of your pet-care needs!

The Benefits of Grooming Your Pooch

Grooming your dog is important, and not just for appearance’s sake (although it works well for that, too!). Here, your Floyds Knob, IN veterinarian tells you about five great benefits of regular grooming sessions with your canine companion.

Skin and Fur Health

Skin and fur health is as important a part of your dog’s well-being as any other aspect of his care. Regular brushing smooths tangles, removes grime from the skin surface, and keeps the fur and skin healthy. The occasional bath—using a canine-formulated shampoo recommended by your veterinarian, of course—is also helpful for great coat health.

Reduced Shedding

Brushing will do wonders for reducing your dog’s shedding. If you think your pooch is leaving an excessive amount of fur all over your home, daily brushing may the answer! Brushing traps loose and dead fur in the implement itself, removing it before it can get stuck in your carpets and furniture. Plus, the brush helps to spread natural skin oils throughout the coat, moisturizing it naturally and reducing shedding initially.

Allergy Control

Do you or members of your family suffer from allergies to pet hair or pet dander? A regular grooming routine may be a big part of the solution. Work closely with your veterinarian and doctor to see what works for you. Many allergy sufferers find success by having their pet groomed so that hair and dander aren’t as prevalent in the home.

Cleanliness

Of course, grooming works well to keep your pet grime-free and clean. Bathing is especially helpful in the event that your dog gets into something sticky or smelly. Both brushing and bathing work to combat pesky pet odors as well—if your home is starting to smell a little too much like Fido, regular brushing sessions and the occasional bath will go a long way toward restoring freshness.

Quality Bonding Time

As a dog owner, you’re well aware of the powerful relationship you share with your canine companion. Grooming sessions at home are a great way to strengthen and solidify that bond! Many dogs come to look forward to daily grooming simply because of the time it affords them with their owners.

Would you like a recommendation on a pet brush or a canine shampoo for your dog? Wondering about the specifics of your dog’s fur- and skin-health requirements? Make an appointment today at your Floyds Knob, IN animal hospital for professional help.

Is Your Dog Obese?

Have you noticed your dog becoming, well, a bit pudgy? Man’s Best Friend does have a habit of packing on the pounds. In fact, by some estimates, well over half of our canine buddies are overweight or obese! While Fido may look cute if he’s a bit chubby, being overweight or obese can bring some very serious health risks for your beloved pet. Read on as a Georgetown, IN vet discusses obesity in dogs.

Health Risks

Those extra pounds are very bad for your four-legged buddy’s health. Dogs that are overweight or obese have higher chances of developing many health problems, including heart disease, liver problems, diabetes, reproductive difficulty, skin trouble, and complications after surgery/anesthesia. Being overweight can also lead to or aggravate painful bone/joint conditions, such as arthritis. Those extra pounds can even shorten Fido’s life expectancy!

Diet

While sometimes age, breed, or medical conditions can cause dogs to gain weight, more often overfeeding, combined with a lack of exercise, is the culprit. You’ll want to feed your canine pal a nutritious, high-quality diet, but don’t overdo it with fatty treats. Ask your vet for specific nutritional advice, including portion sizes.

Begging

We really can’t discuss canine obesity without at least touching on the topic of begging. Fido is very, very good at convincing us to hand over yummy snacks. We know, that sad puppy-dog stare can be very effective, but don’t fall for it! Begging is bad doggy manners, and is a major factor in canine obesity. If you just can’t resist your pet’s theatrics, offer the furball a carrot instead of a cheeseburger.

Exercise

All dogs need some form of activity, though the exact type and amount of exercise Fido needs will depend on his age, breed, health, and weight. Most dogs require at least a daily walk, but some of our canine buddies need quite a bit more activity than that. Making sure your furry pal is getting enough exercise is very important! Check with your vet before starting Fido on a workout regimen, however, as vigorous exercise isn’t right for every pooch. If Fido is more active than you are, engage him with fun games like fetch, which will keep him moving but won’t tire you out.

Do you have questions or concerns about your dog’s health, or care? We can help! Please contact us, your Georgetown, IN animal hospital, anytime.

Lengthen Your Pet’s Life with These 5 Essential Tips

What pet owner wouldn’t want to maximize the time they have with their beloved animal companion? Use these five tips, as discussed by your Floyds Knob, IN vet, to keep your furry friend around for as long as possible.

Veterinary Visits

The importance of regular veterinary visits cannot be stressed enough. They allow your veterinarian to catch any health problems early, before they’re allowed to develop into major medical issues. Office visits also let your vet keep you updated on the latest pet-care techniques and insights. Most veterinarians recommend that they see pets at least twice a year, so set up an appointment today.

Preventative Medicine

Vaccinations and preventative pest medications are two of the best ways to keep your pet healthy throughout their lifetime. Vaccinations protect against worrisome and costly disease, and pest medications avoid the hassles of infestations and infections. If your pet needs vaccines, booster shots on the vaccines they already have, or preventative medications against fleas, ticks, or parasites, call your vet.

Quality Diet

Feeding your pet an age-appropriate, well-balanced diet throughout their lifetime is key to maintaining good health over the years. Ask your veterinarian to recommend a premium cat or dog food for your pet, and see if specially formulated diets for specific health benefits would be useful. Also be sure to ask about proper portion sizes and scheduled mealtimes.

Regular Exercise

Every pet needs their exercise to stay healthy. Obesity is one of the leading causes of health issues amongst today’s domestic pet population; avoid it with regular exercise, coupled with a great diet. Take your pet on walks, romp around on the living room floor, or play fetch the backyard. However you accomplish it, be sure to get your pet moving for several minutes at a time, at least once per day.

Dental Health

Dental health is an often-overlooked aspect of pet care, and oral issues are some of the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pets as a result. Don’t let your pet fall victim to the dangers of dental issues—check the teeth and gums regularly, brush your pet’s teeth with a canine- or feline-formulated toothpaste, and provide your pet with good chew toys to help scrape off excess plaque before it can harden into tartar.

Your Floyds Knob, IN veterinarian is here to answer any further questions you have about your pet’s health and well-being. Call the clinic today!

Rounding Up a Good Dog Trainer

Your Labrador retriever Lance thinks you need more exercise. Since he’s a considerate pooch, this rambunctious three-year-old dog gives you several daily workouts. During each neighborhood walk, he happily yanks you down the street, your arms and legs screaming from the exertion. Clearly, Lance needs some discipline and direction. Your Floyds Knob, IN veterinary clinic has recommended a well-known dog trainer. Before you enroll your companion for an obedience class, though, observe the instructor’s on-the-job performance.

Secure, Well-Maintained Facility

Lance is a born rebel, always finding ways to circumvent the rules. He’ll try to break out of the training center, so you’re glad to see the heavy exterior doors. You’re even happier to see a sign requiring proof of current vaccinations before students can enter.

Expect a clutter-free training room with a squeaky-clean floor. The trainer should provide plenty of paper towels and disinfectant for the dogs’ potty accidents. Pet parents also want nicely equipped facilities. Each bathroom should contain toilet tissue, towels, soap, and cleaning supplies.

Canine/Human Partnership

You (or another familiar family member) will be attending class with Lance. If your canine housemate frequently hears commands from one person, the training is more likely to be successful.

Ideally, the class will have six or fewer students. The trainer wants to provide each student with personal attention, and she’ll find that difficult if she’s overrun with dogs.

Respectful, Positive Attitude

Competent dog trainers use respectful training aids such as harnesses, head halters, and flat collars. You’ll probably see treats and toys used as incentives or rewards. Avoid an instructor who breaks out uncomfortable, negative training devices. If you see prong, choke, or electronic collars, steer clear of that facility.

Punishment’s Off Limits

An experienced, confident instructor always uses a normal tone of voice. Don’t tolerate a trainer who yells or yanks the students’ leashes so they’ll listen. If she hits, kicks, or otherwise abuses a trusting pooch, walk out immediately.

Afterward, learn about the trainer’s qualifications. If she belongs to a dog training organization, she’s likely serious about maintaining (and improving) her professional skills. If you’re pleased with what you’ve observed, sign Lance up for the next class.

When your companion next visits your Floyds Knob, IN veterinary clinic, the vet will be pleased with his obedience skills. If your dog needs some discipline, contact us for an appointment.